You want evidence, not special interest group, based policy?

By Emilio Garcia | The Spectator

All too often the information spreading across social media and into reporting misleads users and is inaccurate or all-around fake. In response to this, fact-checkers and social media platforms have waged a somewhat ineffective crackdown on misinformation. Yet this misinformation has seeped into our government and has begun impacting a broad set of issues including the vaping debate, the drought facing Australian farmers, and even climate policy.

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Brian Marlow
Why celebrate a tyranny?

By Satya Marar | The Spectator

Seventy years ago, the authoritarian dictatorship of the Chinese Communist Party was established.

The “Great Leap Forward” which followed in the fifties was one of the largest acts of systematic genocide in world history, taking 45 million lives in just four years.

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Satyajeet Marar
Hong Kong Is Our Issue

By Satya Marar | The Daily Telegraph

It’s tempting to see the mainland Chinese government’s recent repression of Hong Kong as far removed from Australia’s national interests. Yet at a time when politicians like Gladys Liu and state representatives in NSW and Queensland are already being linked to or even outright support groups that serve the interests of the authoritarian and increasingly brazen Chinese Communist Party (CCP), these events in fact mark the beginning of a new chapter in Sino-Australian relations. One which threatens not only our sovereignty, but our businesses, investors and workers.

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Satyajeet Marar
The rustbelt Libs belt their own

By Satya Marar | The Spectator

Business and investors are up in arms about the Liberal South Australian government’s land tax reforms. Scott Salisbury, Managing Director of Salisbury Homes, this week has become just the latest to warn that the changes not only risk handing over government back to the Labor Party with a large war chest, but that they alienating the SA Liberals’ voter base.

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Satyajeet Marar
The death of ScoMo’s cash ban is welcome

By Satya Marar | The Spectator

Government legislation that would have outlawed cash payments for goods and services exceeding $10,000 AUD to or between businesses has just been set aside and referred to a committee that won’t report back until February 2020. Although this setback for the bill is a notable victory, it should be seen as part of a wider pattern amongst world governments to push for cash’s demise for the sake of their own interests.

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Brian Marlow
Like cheap, clean energy? You’ll love nuclear

By Satya Marar | The Spectator

There is no greater act of economic or environmental vandalism in Australian history than our nonsensical prohibition on nuclear power. It’s doubly perplexing that successive state and federal governments have given in to the whims and bullying of anti-nuclear activists and special interest lobbyists when Australia has the world’s largest uranium reserves.

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Satyajeet Marar
How Hong Kong hospitals fought to treat police violence victims

By Eliot Metherell | The Spectator

Hundreds of medical personnel from three hospitals across Hong Kong have staged sit-ins this week in resistance to the excessive violence used by police when responding to protests.

The savagery dished out by police was compared to that dished out by the triads in their infamous attack on passengers and protesters in Yuen Long train station.

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Brian Marlow
Is Hong Kong’s proposal to withdraw Extradition Bill a ruse?

By Brian Marlow | The Daily Telegraph

News that Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam has proposed to withdraw the now-infamous Extradition Bill, the catalyst for more than three months of protests in Hong Kong, appears to be a cause for celebration.

Dig a little deeper, however, and you can see that this is nothing more than a thinly veiled ruse designed to convince the United States to avoid imposing further sanctions that would cripple China and limit their expansion.

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Brian Marlow
So we'll hit our renewable energy target by 2020 -- but at what cost?

By Emilie Dye | The Spectator

Their ABC is rejoicing. We’ll hit our renewable energy target by 2020. But at what cost? The Australian government only recently rolled out a $11.7 million energy program to help small businesses assess the prices offered by different energy providers. Small businesses, especially in the hospitality industry, are struggling to keep the lights on. The energy companies are begging the states to allow them to use the resources at their feet.

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Brian Marlow
Vaping Critics Ignore The Bigger Picture

By Satya Marar | Herald Sun

16 years after the first e-cigarette was invented, media outlets across the world have been quick to link the devices to what is apparently their first potential ‘death’. The case has fueled concerns about the potential harms of vaping, a proven harm reduction tool for smokers who struggle to quit their habit, despite no identified cause and much of its surrounding circumstances remaining unknown.

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Satyajeet Marar
How to reindustrialise Australia?

BY SATYA MARAR | THE SPECTATOR

The Australian steel producer BlueScope will invest $1 billion in an Ohio-based American steel plant, citing the United States’ energy-friendly policies which have driven power bills down to a third of what Australians pay as a decisive factor. This hasn’t just been good news for American businesses. It has also meant thousands of high-quality jobs in a sector that has long been thought of as resigned to an inevitable decline and end due to automation and competition from developing countries with low labour costs.

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Brian Marlow
Prosecco is just the tip of the EU trade war iceberg

BY SATYA MARAR | THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

If our government isn’t careful, it could end up trading away the rights and interests of Australian businesses and consumers to placate the whims of Brussels-based bureaucrats and social engineers driven by a combination of nanny state fetishism and, ironically enough, old-fashioned European nativism.

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Brian Marlow
Don't Shut Down Debate: Does The ALP Really Want Us To Have Blasphemy Laws?

BY SATYA MARAR | THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

Iranian Ayatollah Khomeni and the despotic Saudi regime found unlikely Australian allies this week in Labor Senators Penny Wong and failed NSW Premier Kristina Keneally. Wong and Keneally smeared conservative political opponents including Liberal Senator Amanda Stoker and Craig Kelly MP for appearing at the Conservative Political Action Conference or CPAC to be held from August 9-11 in Sydney.

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Brian Marlow
Gas reserve is all hot air

BY SATYA MARAR | THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

We’ll never unleash our energy potential if we fall for a policy that discouraged investment over the long term, writes Satya Marar.

Although they might lower power prices at least in the short-term, the Morrison government’s planned export restrictions on gas are a Band-Aid solution which will backfire and cause job losses and long-term damage to the economy, government revenues, and even natural gas supply. They are no substitute for boosting supply by removing unnecessary restrictions on gas extraction pervasive throughout our eastern states.

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Brian Marlow
The High Court’s high-stakes ruling threatens liberty

BY SATYA MARAR | THE SPECTATOR

Conservatives and left-wingers alike should oppose today’s High Court decision which found that the Australian Public Service, specifically the Department of Immigration and Border Protection, had not violated the constitutionally-protected implied freedom of political communication of one of its employees by firing her for tweets which were critical of the government.

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Brian Marlow